When Apple announced the iPhone 4S with Siri, thousands of loyal Apple fans stood in long lines waiting for a chance to finally talk to their phones. And as technology continues to evolve in the data analytics and Business Intelligence spectrum, it is clear that businesses will look for ways to answer questions, plan, create reports on the fly, and discover insights through effective analysis.

According to a report by Gartner, by 2016, 70% of leading BI vendors will have incorporated natural-language and spoken-word capabilities. Perhaps the computer program incorporated will be given fancy computer names like Siri or Skyvi for Android. No matter what they are called, this advancement will transform how businesses interact with their Business Intelligence applications.

The natural-language commands feature could eliminate the tedious, manual creation of reports and manipulation of data. A critical component of delivering reports by voice commands may lie in the connectivity capability of the Business Intelligence product at hand. If the software is not dynamically connected to a transactional database in such a way that reports are updated automatically, it may be difficult to get accurate answers to business questions in real time through voice activated commands. When it comes to live updates, Visionary Intelligence solution OLATION seems to be ahead of the curve—OLATION updates reports within seconds, making it ready for wherever the technology wind blows in the upcoming years.

Certainly, the ability to talk naturally to your Business Intelligence solution will be a revolution in the Business Intelligence technology industry. If you had this feature, how would you use it?

Related Posts:

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OLATION-The Future of Data Management

Three Simple But Surprisingly Brillant Questions To Ask A BI Vendor

~Blog Post By: Hellen Oti-Yeboah

David Newton

David Newton

Sports trivia junkie, sometimes to be seen taking divots out of golf course fairways or heard launching into operatic song.
David Newton